Corporate Training & e-Learning Blog

Thursday

Corporate Podcasting

I have received many emails and phone calls about corporate podcasting since mentioning it in previous posts. I have even been interviewed by a couple of magazines, so I remain on the lookout for news on the continued growth of this very cool communication and learning medium. Chief Learning Officer's (CLO) Kellye Whitney wrote something interesting this week about how Prentice Hall is using podcasting to help train their own traveling textbook sales reps.

The vice president of Business Publishing at Prentice Hall believes that people learn best when they're stimulated and when the information is informative and also entertaining, which he believes they can and are doing with podcasting. Needless to say, podcasting also makes the information highly convenient and remarkably accessible! As a result, mobile learning options such as podcasting could very well allow for greater absorption of information. And that's what it's all about in today's competitive corporate arena, wouldn't you say? If done well, of course, mobile learners can enjoy training that is more along the lines of infotainment than just pure information.


The CLO article also cites some interesting 2005 statistics from a study conducted by a mobile market intelligence company called CLX:
  • 15% of US respondents listen to podcasts
  • The two groups most likely to listen to podcasts are 45-55 year olds and 55+ year olds
Are you as surprised to read this as I was? It appears that this new-fangled technology called podcasting can be used to create learning programs that appeal to all ages! (I just can't yet picture my parents or grandparents walking around listening intently to iPods, but you never know!)

3 Comments:

  • Not surprising that some prefer podcasts to text. Most people can absorb far more through audio and/or video than through text, and they absorb it much faster. Then, there's the multitasking thing. Not that the 45+ demographic is better at that, but it has become a neccessary skill to deal with too much information.
    That brings up another question: If multiple media formats make it easier to learn, why wouldn't training and education developers want to integrate audio and video into courseware?
    See www.QMIND.com for a demo of how that could work.
    See www.BetterManagement.com. They were experimenting successfully with podcasts nearly 6 years ago.
    At this point, podcasting still distinguises your content...somewhat. Not for long. Bandwidth shows no sign of shrinking. More sophisticated presentations are the new standard. More personality in the presentation format is an opportunity to extend branding. Entertainment, education and interaction are converging to make information transfer more engaging, and more memorable.

    By Blogger Chas Martin, at 8:12 PM EST  

  • Not surprising that some prefer podcasts to text. Most people can absorb far more through audio and/or video than through text, and they absorb it much faster. Then, there's the multitasking thing. Not that the 45+ demographic is better at that, but it has become a neccessary skill to deal with too much information.
    That brings up another question: If multiple media formats make it easier to learn, why wouldn't training and education developers want to integrate audio and video into courseware?
    See www.QMIND.com for a demo of how that could work.
    See www.BetterManagement.com. They were experimenting successfully with podcasts nearly 6 years ago.
    At this point, podcasting still distinguises your content...somewhat. Not for long. Bandwidth shows no sign of shrinking. More sophisticated presentations are the new standard. More personality in the presentation format is an opportunity to extend branding. Entertainment, education and interaction are converging to make information transfer more engaging, and more memorable.

    By Blogger Chas Martin, at 8:12 PM EST  

  • To me, they are merely audio files. Audio files are also used on audiotapes, CD's, etc. I know these have their place, but hopefully the excitement about being able to put lots of mp3 files on a small gadget doesn't lead any trainers down the wrong path, which I see happening. If you are talented with creating video and audio presentations and can identify a use for the file, do it. Otherwise, seek help in working with this medium. The other issue I see with this is that some trainers are expecting everyone to download these files and listen on their own time. No. If you want people to listen, then expect them to listen at work and to use work time to listen. I think this is a good topic and timely. Thanks for your post!

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 3:30 PM EST  

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